Category Archives: Fabric

iSpy bags

I’m hooked!  On Pinetrest that is!  I found this idea a few days ago and had the materials (mostly) laying around.

I found this great tutorial here and l decided that because I had most of the materials already laying around, I could make some of these.  I went to Jo-Ann’s and looked for things that were small: beads, rhinestones, buttons, etc., that would fit inside one of these bags.  I also purchased two 32 oz. bags of plastic pellets, used to fill up dolls/children’s toys.  I have made 13 so far (they are not all pictured).  I also purchased some bags of trinkets from a store on etsy. (LOVE etsy!)

The items you see laying on the white paper will eventually be printed off, laminated, and attached with grommets so that the children can use a dry erase marker to circle the items that they have found.

Wouldn’t these be great with magnetic items inside as well? 🙂  For the bag with the numbers, I was thinking it would be great addition and subtraction practice for the children to find a number, then roll a die to see if they would add or subtract the next number they find!  You could do all kinds of things with these!  Use them in Work Stations, make them easy or difficult…how about putting sight words in them and letting the children write them as they find them?  How about printing the words in tiny font and using a magnifying glass to read them and then say them out loud?  The alphabet bags could be used to spell words…the ideas are endless…do you have any other ideas?  Leave them in a comment here! 🙂

I am thinking of making some to sell.  I made mine so that they correlate to units or themes we are working on in our IB units.  So far, I’ve got one for ponds, letters, numbers, recycling, gingerbread men/women, animals, pets, and a few just for fun ones!

Let me know if you might be interested in purchasing one or two…I’m thinking $10 for each one, with laminated tag included and attached. 🙂

Kristen 🙂

Fabric

As part of our text book adoption in Science this year we are looking into some of the kits that are available.  I am using one right now in my classroom that is all about Fabric.  To be honest, at first I didn’t think my kiddos would be so excited about fabric–but the LOVE it with a capital L!

The first day we checked out the fabrics and compared them to each other.  We also made a list after feeling each one that helped us to write down some of the “touch” words (rough, smooth, silky, bumpy, etc.).  Then, I taught the children the “Feely Box Game”.  There are 9 or 10 different fabric sample squares.  I put one set of the 9 or 10 on the table and the other set into a feely box (a box that you can’t see into and has one opening for the children to put their hand into).  The idea is that the children use their sense of touch to figure out which fabrics match.  They pick up one from outside the box and try to find the match from inside the box, using only their sense of touch.

 

The next activity we did was to hunt for fabrics.  When the children were at recess, I hid swatches of fabric around the room.  I laid matching swatches on the childrens’ tables.  They had to find a swatch that exactly matched theirs and then return to their seats.  All of the swatches are blue so it was difficult to find 23 hiding places for the swatches, but as it ended up, some were hidden so well, we didn’t find them for an hour after the hunt was over.

Comparing swatches to see if they match

 

We also created fabric collages.  The children could choose from a variety of different fabrics and were free to cut them any way they wanted to.

This one of the collages that the children created.

 

Another activity we completed was to learn about how fabric is held together.  We learned about the woof and the weave of fabric and then the children got to pull strings from either side of the fabric.  They had TONS of fun unraveling fabric for the purpose of science! 🙂

The children glued what was left of their square of fabric into their science journal and then wrote about their thoughts on how fabric is woven together.

Kristen 🙂

 

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